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Featured carpet cleaning service area: Egg Harbor Township

Great Egg Harbor got its name from Dutch explorer Cornelius Jacobsen Mey. In 1614, Mey came upon the inlet to the Great Egg Harbor River. The meadows were so covered with shorebird and waterfowl eggs that he called it "Eieren Haven" (Egg Harbor).

The first residents of what would become Egg Harbor Township were the Lenni Lenape Native Americans, who would spend their summers on the elevated land around the cedar swamp that is now Bargaintown Lake, as well as along the banks of Patcong Creek, where they made use of the abundant fish, shellfish, wild berries, and bird's eggs in the area and collected shells that could be carved to make wampum.

Great Egg Harbor was originally part of Gloucester County. In 1694 a law was passed that read "forasmuch as there are families settled upon the Egg Harbor, and of right ought to be under some jurisdiction, be it enacted by the authority aforesaid that the inhabitants of the said Egg Harbor shall and do belong to the jurisdiction of Gloucester."

In 1710, by an Act of the Legislature, legal boundaries of Gloucester County were set from the Delaware River, along the Burlington County line to the sea and back up the Great Egg Harbor River to the Delaware River. At that time Great Egg Harbor encompassed all of present-day Atlantic County. In 1837, Atlantic County was set apart from Gloucester County and the Townships were Egg Harbor, Galloway, Hamilton and Weymouth.

Since 1837, ten municipalities have separated from the original Egg Harbor Township, including Atlantic City (1854), Absecon (1872), South Atlantic City (now Margate) (1885), Somers Point (1886), Pleasantville (1888), Linwood (1889), Longport (1898), Brigantine (1903), Ventnor (1903) and Northfield (1905).

The 177th Fighter Wing is located at the Atlantic City International Airport, Egg Harbor Township, NJ. The wing has been at this location since 1958.

The 177th Fighter Wing is located at the Atlantic City International Airport, Egg Harbor Township, NJ. The wing has been at this location since 1958.

Points of interest

  • The Atlantic County Bikeway stretches for 7.5 miles (12.1 km) from the Shore Mall to the Atlantic County Institute of Technology in Hamilton Township.
  • Storybook Land is a park for children on a site covering 20 acres (8.1 ha) that was opened in 1955, featuring storybook characters such as Mother Goose and the Three Little Pigs.
  • Jersey Shore Children's Museum provides an environment for children that stimulates creativity, imagination, and learning through interactive play.

Protect Your Pets! Don't use store carpet cleaning chemicals... Here is why.

Photo by Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images Entertainment / Getty Images
Photo by Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images Entertainment / Getty Images

Diane had a cat that suffered for many years from an over-active thyroid and excessive shedding. Her cats vet could never exactly figure out what caused her condition. She was an indoor cat, so there was no way she would have picked up something from the neighborhood. It never occurred to Diane that the source of her problem could be right in her own house.

I read about a study done by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the non-profit Environmental Working Group (EWG). Researchers found that pet cats and dogs are being contaminated with even higher levels of the same synthetic industrial chemicals that have been found in people. The findings gave Diane another reason to switch to steam carpet cleaning.

The research results were sobering. All 20 dogs and 40 cats studied were contaminated with 48 of 70 industrial chemicals tested. Average levels of many chemicals were substantially higher in pets than is typical for people, with 2.4 times higher levels of stain-and grease-proof coatings (perfluorochemicals) in dogs, 23 times more fire retardants (PBDEs) in cats, and more than 5 times the amounts of mercury, compared to average levels in people found in other studies conducted by the CDC and EWG.

When you stop and think about it, it makes unfortunate sense. Our pets spend all of their time crawling around the floor or laying on the rugs and furniture, exposing them every day to any chemicals we use. She hated to think that the solvent she was using to clean up spilled wine, were being inhaled by her pets, or rubbing off on their paws, which they would then lick. Diane actually had two cats, plus a dog. She says, "I didn’t want any of them endangered."

However, not only were these cleansers bad for her beloved animals. They were bad for her and her children, too. "We spent a lot of time on the floor when our kids were babies, toddlers, and pre-teens. They were being exposed to the same chemicals that the pets were."

Here’s another worrisome impact from these chemical exposures: They stick around. Many of the toxic ingredients used in common industrial and household cleansers have a tendency to concentrate in the body, creating what is called a “body burden” of chemicals that can combine for negative effect. Pets, with their compressed lifespans, develop and age seven or more times faster than people do. As a result, pets can develop health problems in response to these chemical exposures much more rapidly.

Health problems in pets span high rates of cancer in dogs and skyrocketing incidence of hyperthyroidism in cats. Genetic changes can’t explain the increases in certain health problems among pets, leaving scientists to believe that chemical exposures play a significant role.

Once she realized how dangerous carpet cleaning chemicals from the store could be, Diane took the following step:

"I switched to steam cleaning."

Steam cleaning relies on steaming hot water to penetrate dirt and work away grime, without the need for heavy chemicals usage. Leaving the bare minimum of chemical residue behind. 

How do you keep your carpets clean without exposing your pets to toxic chemicals? We’d love to hear your tips! Leave them in the comments below or email us!

Shop Smart: How Do I Choose a Quality Area Rug?

Think of them as mini magic carpets with the power to transform a room. Here, how to choose a rug that suits your life, your style, and your budget

quality area rug cleaning

They’re really rather amazing, area rugs, creating maximum impact in minimum space, sparking visual interest, adding welcome cushioning, and muffling the sounds of foot traffic. Between a $10,000 Persian and a cheesy runner from the dollar store lie dozens of options. Let us walk you through the wide array of affordable, high-quality floor coverings available now.

The Right Stuff

If you change your decor nearly as often as you change your outfit, choose synthetic rugs — polypropylene or nylon — which provide water- and UV-resistance at low prices. A 5' by 8' can be had for less than $100. Nylon is the higher quality of the two because of its bulk (yarn made of polypropylene fibers can get crushed over time), plus it holds color well. But both synthetics are excellent at masking dirt. Cotton rugs, $50 and up, are an even more affordable choice, but they can stain and wear out quickly (though you can throw them in a large washing machine). Want something eco-friendly? Plant-based fibers such as sisal, jute, and bamboo are not only biodegradable but made from renewable resources. Especially good for sunrooms or outdoor use because they shed water easily, plant-based fibers are difficult to clean and may last only a few years with heavy use; still, they start at a low $100.

Entertain often or need a stylish floor covering for a high-traffic area? Check out wool. The fibers are naturally stain-resistant and don’t flatten easily (just vacuum regularly to revive). Wool rugs should last decades, but you pay for the durability: They start at $300 and run as high as that pricey Persian, which can range from $200 for a machine-made 5' by 8' replica up to thousands of dollars for an authentic hand-knotted one (more on both of these methods below).

Quality Counts: Measure the Knots

Hand-knotted rugs are the gold standard — they’re the most durable, have the finest details, and should survive generations. And though the hand-knotted technique is ancient, originating in Persia, it’s still used on contemporary rugs. The more knots per square inch, the better (they can vary from 40 to 1,200). Next best thing? Hand-tufted rugs; they’re half man-made, half machine-made. (You’ll see the term “handmade,” but it’s essentially meaningless.) Check the underside of the rug — if you see the pattern in reverse, it’s a hand-knotted piece; if you see a backing, it’s hand-tufted. And on any hand-knotted or hand-tufted rug, look for the RugMark label, which means it was made without child labor. Machine-made rugs generally cost less than a third of the price of hand-knotted versions.

Size Wise: How Big, How Small?

An area rug is meant to give a room a focal point. If the rug is too big, it just looks like wall-to-wall carpeting; if it’s too skimpy, it fails to draw the eye and make the room inviting. (Worst-case scenario: It looks as if someone accidentally left a towel on the floor.) Consider comfort when you choose thickness. For the bedroom, allow three feet of rug on either side of the bed if you and your partner both want a soft landing in the morning (your nightstands should be on the rug as well). In the dining room, be sure the rug is large enough to fit beneath a chair that’s pushed back from the table, then add six more inches. In the living room, personal preference rules. Furniture that’s half-on, half-off the rug creates a casual look; furniture entirely on or off is more formal. Finally, a rug’s price should match the cost of other major furniture in the room. In a living room, for example, the floor covering should be about the price of the sofa.

Rug Pads: Your Floors Best Friend

These handy floor savers not only provide comfort and prevent slipping, they can also add years to the life of the rug you just purchased, since less movement means less friction (read: less wear and tear). Most are made of synthetic materials - such as PVC or latex - and though they may vary in thickness (a thicker one will make your rug feel cushier), most have the same gripping capabilities. Buy a pad that's one or two inches smaller than your rug, and in your price range. (Pads range from $20 to $80.)

Now that you know how to spot a quality area rug, check out Foggs Carpet and Rug Cleaning for quality rug cleaning and restoration!

For more details check out this video from our friends at Serafian's